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When streaming from plex my router restarts, why?

EthryEthry Posts: 8Members ✭✭

Hello!

Not sure where to post this, so I will try here. I have an issue with plex where it causes my router to restart.

In short: everytime I stream from my plex media server on my TV my wireless extender restarts, this happens on random intervals from 1-45 min into a film/series. At first I thought it was a coincidence, but this happens only and consistently when using plex. I used the same setup flawlessly for 3 years before I upgraded my computer to Windows 10, after that update the problem started.

My setup: TV which is connected by cable to Netgear R8000 nighthawk x6, which is wireless connected to Netgear nighthawk EX7000 which is connected by cable to desktop computer with plex media server.

I have tried to google / search this problem extensively and I cannot find a solution! please help me

Thanks so much in advance.

Answers

  • anajamesanajames Posts: 15Members ✭✭

    Have you tried using your router for some other purpose, may be the router is malfunctioning?

  • umiq88umiq88 Posts: 69Members, Plex Pass Plex Pass

    Are you running stock firmware??

    If its custom firmware they often from time to time have issues just roll back or go to a newer release.

    In your firmware have you any way of keeping an eye on temps. Sounds like something might be heating up or else it may just be malfunctioning.

  • EthryEthry Posts: 8Members ✭✭

    Yes, the router is in daily use with the computer for downloading / webbrowsing / gaming ( all works perfect ) When I go watch plex on the TV, it crashes.

    I did update the software on the extender, should be of newest date.. dont think it allows to monitor the temp of it, but I dont think it overheats.

  • blautensblautens Posts: 32Members, Plex Pass Plex Pass
    edited April 21

    I love these sorts of problems. I don't have a Netgear R7000, but they're nice routers with plenty of CPU, so it should not be overwhelmed.

    But I've seen a 10 year old Intel print server send enough TCP resets to a 2 node proxy/firewall array that it essentially brought it down, so anything is possible.

    I'll mention 2.5 guesses, and then the nitty gritty.

    Easy first guess - someone claimed the new Microsoft Windows P2P update process was the culprit - shutting it off - no more reboots.

    I'm also going to suggest turning off IPv6 on the Windows box. I have personally seen that cause a Windows 8.1 VM running Plex Media Server to work fairly poor;ly. Microsoft is getting more and more adamant over the years that you shouldn't do this, and I halfway agree (it's key in Windows clusters, for instance), but for troubleshooting purposes it's worth a try. And please note, unchecking the IPv6 option in most versions of Windows doesn't actually work, like all good things you either need powershell or manual registry changes, and I'm fairly certain WIndows 10 has that problem also. Microsoft has a bunch of Fix-its that will change the registry for you.

    I'd also suggest looking at the NIC driver. I spent 1.5 years in the middle of HP, Emulex, and Microsoft fighting about NIC drivers that I'd definitely want that researched (IE, does the NIC vendor have a newer driver, or are strange options now available if it uses a Windows driver, etc.).

    If you do a little Googling, you will see enough people (not tons, but enough) that have similar issues once they moved to Windows 10 (no Plex involved). Why does it do it for you only when Plex is streaming? Well that's the key, and it's awesome you can reproduce that. Because now we can capture some data!

    Were it me, no matter what, I'd run Wireshark on the Windows 10 PC - capture traffic with Plex and without Plex. I might also run Process Monitor (Google is your friend) but that will really load the system down, so I'd hold off on that for last.

    You're gonna see a lot of broadcasts in those captures...Windows 10 REALLY likes broadcast traffic.

    Ideally, the other data we want to capture is any logging from your router. I'm fairly certain you can enable a higher level of logging (debug level, if you will) in that. You might need to write to a syslog server, though, or a USB flash drive - I'm not sure how to get as much info as possible retained before it reboots and how it retains logging by default..

    Then...you look at all the data you capture, see what jumps out.

    Yeah, that part is a little harder. I just sort of look at things and poke around and 99% of the time figure out root cause. :)

  • blautensblautens Posts: 32Members, Plex Pass Plex Pass
    edited April 21

    By the way, I'm just gonna throw this out there - you seem like a very smart guy - and I know this was working fine for you before and we should get it that way again...but...just in case you wanted to go a different route (no pun intended) - I have a fairly biggish house, and I've tried a few different setups, since networking, albeit enterprise/virtual, is one of the things I do for a living - and my best experiencing trying to cover the house and making video streaming ultra reliable for my wife (who has a chronic illness and is often confined to one area, so reliability is super important to me, and also, particularly given my job, potentially embarrassing if it's not) was having two nice wireless routers like yours (in my case an Asus RT-AC66 and and RT-AC68), one of them in access point mode and I connected them both via powerline networking rather than wireless.

    I know it doesn't work for everyone, but I have a new enough house that the wiring is up to snuff and not dorked with and it has worked stunningly well for 5 years or so. I've upgraded as they've gotten faster, but always had good luck with TP-Link powerline adapters/range extenders.

    And you can debate the throughput for either in theory - wireless is cut in half for bridging, powerline is always rated wistfully in the chipset's "theoretical possible maximum" speeds - but you don't know until you try it in the environment itself (Amazon - good return policy) and measure it with real tools and over a reasonable period of time.

    Here's what I've found to be the major upside - reliability/latency of that connection. And streaming video loves that. Those little Rokus and Chromecasts and my Plex server - they don't like hiccups. You may or may not get the throughput of two honking big wireless routers. But boy, capture traffic for 24 hours, or days, or weeks...just make sure you measure consistency/latency. It's really good. Because here's the thing. EVERY damn thing you buy wants to fill up your airspace...I have 33 freaking devices in my house wanting to chat via 802.11. I do everything I can to get them on ethernet if possible (possibly over powerline networking) or at least survey the wireless in that area, use a heat mapper or something like that, find out who's crowding the spectrum, and get them on the right frequency and make sure my wireless channel selection is optimal.

    My neighbors did fat channel 2.4 that was overpowering our master bedroom years ago, for instance - early smart phones would latch on to them and not me. Right now some neighbor has the worlds strongest radio ever placed in an HP printer taking up precious spectrum. And we live in suburban houses, not apartments, we aren't on top of each other - I thought I was the only one with high gain and directional antennas, but maybe not. And don't get me started on my three Rokus and their crazy desire to jam your network with their remotes and adhoc networks and not let you control anything. Stupid Rokus with their nice interface and cheap price and wide adoption. Dohh!

    Just a thought. Or two.

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