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Is there an update on the Linux VAAPI situation?

TellementTurkeyTellementTurkey Posts: 4Members, Plex Pass Plex Pass

Thread above says it was due December 22nd, any news on this? Looking forward to hardware transcode on Linux.

Best Answer

  • ChuckPAChuckPA Posts: 19,377Members, Plex Pass, Plex Ninja, Plex Team Member Plex Team Member
    Accepted Answer

    @TellementTurkey said:

    @ChuckPA said:
    Hardware transcoding already works on Linux.

    We are now waiting for Engineering to evaluate the December update and see what new functionally was actually made available.

    Thank you for the comment. I had really bad artifacting when it was first implemented, so I was hoping this would change things. I'll test it again though and wait for the update!

    Not to prejudge your observations without knowing a) your CPU model and b) XML from one of those which have artifacts, a couple things have a profound impact on artifacts

    1. Source codec (VC-1 is still being worked on by Intel.. Maybe the next update (?))
    2. Source bitrate
    3. Processor generation

    Hardware transcoding is not as good as Software transcoding yet. Perhaps when Intel reaches the 11th or 12th generation hardware we'll start to see them indistinguishable. For now, there's a difference. Software wins every time because it's that much more mature whereas the hardware teams are still figuring it out in the silicon.

    That said, older generation intels (-2xxx, -3xxx, -4xxxx processors will clearly show a difference when compared with a -6xxx (skylake) or -7xxx (kabylake) series.

    Now, add to that low bitrate input and you get (forgive the phrase please?) garbage in = garbage out . meaning that if someone is running with 2.5 Mbps video, there's no way HW is going to sustain that quality; not even a kabylake. The trick here is to have enough source bits that you can afford to lose some in transcoding without the eye seeing it

    Does this shine some light on the mystery?

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Answers

  • ChuckPAChuckPA Posts: 19,377Members, Plex Pass, Plex Ninja, Plex Team Member Plex Team Member

    Hardware transcoding already works on Linux.

    We are now waiting for Engineering to evaluate the December update and see what new functionally was actually made available.

    Please DISABLE Verbose logging until requested

    Please search before posting

    Primary support forums: Linux, Synology, and QNAP

    Please remember to report back. This benefits others.

    Useful links

     Installation and Basic Setup |  Media Preparation (How to name your media files)  |  Linux Permissions 

     Handling TV Specials | Handling Movie extras  |  Nas Compatibility List

     Reporting Plex Server issues | Plex Media Server FAQ | Linux Tips

     

    Other useful guides: Local Subtitles | The Plex "dance" | Synology FAQ | PMS Release Announcements

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    Please remember to mark the appropriate answer(s) which solved your issue.

     
  • Johnnyh1975Johnnyh1975 Posts: 31Members, Plex Pass, TunerTester Plex Pass

    I have the 2.0 Version installed - and so far everything works fine. Keep Fingers crossed. I observed a 20% performance increase on my System vs the stable debian package

  • TellementTurkeyTellementTurkey Posts: 4Members, Plex Pass Plex Pass

    @ChuckPA said:
    Hardware transcoding already works on Linux.

    We are now waiting for Engineering to evaluate the December update and see what new functionally was actually made available.

    Thank you for the comment. I had really bad artifacting when it was first implemented, so I was hoping this would change things. I'll test it again though and wait for the update!

  • ChuckPAChuckPA Posts: 19,377Members, Plex Pass, Plex Ninja, Plex Team Member Plex Team Member
    Accepted Answer

    @TellementTurkey said:

    @ChuckPA said:
    Hardware transcoding already works on Linux.

    We are now waiting for Engineering to evaluate the December update and see what new functionally was actually made available.

    Thank you for the comment. I had really bad artifacting when it was first implemented, so I was hoping this would change things. I'll test it again though and wait for the update!

    Not to prejudge your observations without knowing a) your CPU model and b) XML from one of those which have artifacts, a couple things have a profound impact on artifacts

    1. Source codec (VC-1 is still being worked on by Intel.. Maybe the next update (?))
    2. Source bitrate
    3. Processor generation

    Hardware transcoding is not as good as Software transcoding yet. Perhaps when Intel reaches the 11th or 12th generation hardware we'll start to see them indistinguishable. For now, there's a difference. Software wins every time because it's that much more mature whereas the hardware teams are still figuring it out in the silicon.

    That said, older generation intels (-2xxx, -3xxx, -4xxxx processors will clearly show a difference when compared with a -6xxx (skylake) or -7xxx (kabylake) series.

    Now, add to that low bitrate input and you get (forgive the phrase please?) garbage in = garbage out . meaning that if someone is running with 2.5 Mbps video, there's no way HW is going to sustain that quality; not even a kabylake. The trick here is to have enough source bits that you can afford to lose some in transcoding without the eye seeing it

    Does this shine some light on the mystery?

    Please DISABLE Verbose logging until requested

    Please search before posting

    Primary support forums: Linux, Synology, and QNAP

    Please remember to report back. This benefits others.

    Useful links

     Installation and Basic Setup |  Media Preparation (How to name your media files)  |  Linux Permissions 

     Handling TV Specials | Handling Movie extras  |  Nas Compatibility List

     Reporting Plex Server issues | Plex Media Server FAQ | Linux Tips

     

    Other useful guides: Local Subtitles | The Plex "dance" | Synology FAQ | PMS Release Announcements

    Hosts: Fedora, QNAP, Synology, most Linux distros in VM

    No technical support via PM unless offered

    Please remember to mark the appropriate answer(s) which solved your issue.

     
  • TellementTurkeyTellementTurkey Posts: 4Members, Plex Pass Plex Pass
    edited 3:34AM

    @ChuckPA said:
    Does this shine some light on the mystery?

    It does, I am running an old processor i5-2400. It makes sense that this is an issue. Thank you, I'll run some tests with a newer generation processor. I accounted for bit rate/garbage in, and I didn't explicitly consider codec, but I tried a few videos to be sure so it's unlikely to be a codec issue.

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